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the world is unified. there's real differences about what to do, have germany, and take other members of the european community. >> the eastern europeans. >> charlie: how does the president handle that? does he go off on his own and put troops here and there and do this and that or does he wait and try to get some kind of unified plan? >> i think he needs to do a little more leading from in front. i think he has to do both a major effort to keep the united states and europe together, understanding that the european dependence on russian energy is going to make it tough, and on trade with russia. german trade with russia is huge and ours is tiny. but, on the other hand, the europeans have 60 years of sort of relying on us for leadership in international affairs and particularly on national security, and they are not yet ready to be co-leaders, and i think a little more american leadership on this would have been important, even while we understand and agree with the point he's making. >> charlie: syria. when the president made the decision not to attack syria after having said it had c
repeatedly. we were promised that after germany's unification than it would not spread eastward. a started expanding and incorporating former warsaw treaty countries. we heard in response this does not concern you. nations and countries have the war to choose the way of ensuring the security. that's true, but it's also true when the infrastructure of the military bloc approaches our borders we have grounds for apprehension question. no one could deny as this right. he went on to say have been no and western leaders have long many times tsongas, made decisions behind the back of price wars and accomplished fact some today we want to examine whether in natal and the newly expanded nato alliance is now reaping the whirlwind of that decision and the ukraine. the of a very distinguished panel of people here today who are essentially present at the creation in one way or another. you will have biographies, but briefly the former foreign minister and actually first prime minister and then foreign minister of poland, going to make the your first name. on my immediate left, prime minister of poland
with germany and the transatlantic trade and investment partnership. this is an hour. >> please welcome dr. angela merkel. [applause] >> ladies and gentlemen, welcome to the chamber of commerce of the united states. period is tom donohue am the president and ceo of the spine institution. i would like to extend a special welcome to those of you visiting our headquarters for the first time. the chamber is a 102-year-old organization. this building serves as a central rallying point for the ..s. business community we host several hundred meetings here in this room alone every year. room we are gathered in today, the international hall of flags, is rich in symbolism and history. afterom takes its name the overhead banners of 12 great explorers who blazed the first paths of trade. they planted the first seeds of commercial and industrial growth in the new world. these flags remind us that the transatlantic relationship has been around for a long time. today, we are reminded just how essential this relationship is. alliance is.-eu critical to global stability, peace, and freedom. this has been p
in germany with hitler? an ableonsidered manager. that is basically what happened. that is basically the root of the problem today with the theine that is part of russian establishment. do you know what happened? 1994, russian elite, the ruling class, those who benefited the most and privatized the results of the --ocratic revolution of 1991 i haven't seen any of those in the so-called white house in augustthe coup 1991. they were quick to privatize the and gasw from the oil experts, which is still the basic economy. amazing the russian onte today is mostly based -- that is the answer to the question. russian elite to enable, theleft russia to post-soviet propaganda that is what it is today. >> [inaudible] [laughter] >> it is very painful for me to say these things. nd disappointed but did you think this would be a back door way? this would morph into an to nato pathway membership even though at the time it was painted in a different fashion? >> i will be frank. at this moment, we are very disappointed. the -- fourhat was nato membership, for the first time, and member of the polish governmen
sanctions against russia. germany ruthlessly pursued its mercantile interest and the lobbyist wrong. it is a very strong economic relationship between germany and russia. including the former german chancellor. he is making money helping national gas -- natural gas flow. >> which goes to one of the fundamental flaws of sanctions as a foreign-policy tool, correct? >> it is a rather blunt instrument. choice than tono try sanctions. politics are a flaw. ismany is what russia -- rubbish' partner. partner.ading what jacktell you lew had to say. >> if you look at the impact on russia's economy it is misleading to look at what happens day by day. you have to look over the time crimeaussia went into since we have imposed sanctions. there has been a substantial in russia'sn and -- weak economy. we see it in their exchange rate and stock exchange and a number of important economic indicators. they were downgraded to one notch above junk and with the rationale and the bond rating was in part the sanctions being imposed. the question is how do we proceed and occur -- a careful way step-by-step
, everybody. it is always a great pleasure to welcome my friend chancellor merkel to the white house. germany is one of our strongest allies and angela is one of my closest partners. with her indulgence, i want to start by making two brief comments. first, as president, my top priority is doing everything we can to create more jobs and opportunity for hard-working families for our economic strength as a source of strength in the world. this morning, we learned our created 200 77,000 new jobs last month. all told, our business is now created 9.2 million new jobs over 50 consecutive months of job growth. the grit and determination of the american people are moving us forward but we have to keep a relentless focus on job creation and creating more opportunities for work and families. there is plenty more that congress should be doing from raising the minimum wage to creating good construction jobs and rebuilding america. i want to work with them wherever i can but i keep acting on my own wherever i must to make sure every american who works art has the chance to get ahead. -- i also wantt to say
to him multiple timesk and germany is pivotal, because they are reluctant to go further with the further ek sectorial sanctions, because of the impact on the german economy. the trade between germany and russia was $1 billion and u.s. and germany was only $38 million. and germany gets roughly one-third of the oil and gas from russia, so a real concern within the german industry that they are the ones putting the pressure on angela merkel to be careful of what she does next because of the ricochet effect, and anything they do in russia could come back to haunt the german economy as well. >> a lot of money is at stake. and ambassador holliday, i want to get to you, and what do you think about the sanctions, and could they really get vladimir putin to change course here? >> well, it is going to be difficult to get him to change the course, but the increased sa sanctions could be twofold. one, we could get the europeans and germany in particular to escalate the sanctions on targeted energy companies, on that sector, but broadly speaking, we could go up to full sectorial sanctions which would
. thanwonder if we care more angela merkel does. germany has a great business relationship with russia. wentieve gerhard schroder to work for a russian company after he was chancellor of germany. it seems that america has this , cold war,0's style leftover unhappiness, but no reason to be so worried. quickly direct economic interest in ukraine for the united states is not great. is alsode with russia not huge, although companies such as exxon mobil and boeing have important projects in russia. but it is important for foreign policy credibility. the u.s. has certain red lines. it committed to defending ukraine's territorial sovereignty. that credibility is important with respect to asia. president obama was reassuring asian partners and allies the u.s. would come to their defense in a situation in which chinese territorial ambitions seem to be growing. or is a broader repercussion that goes beyond ukraine and russia for the united states. >> we seem to be spreading ourselves them. we are going to defend asian countries against china? we are going to defend the ukraine against russia? di
it repeatedly saying we were promised after germany's unification nato wouldn't expand eastward but they started expanding and taking warsaw treaty countries. when we said why are you doing this we heard this doesn't concern you nations and countries have the right to chose their own security. and he said that is true. but whether the infrastructure of military blocks or approaches our borders we must take concern steps and no one can deny this. he said nato and leaders lied many times and placed before him an accomplished fact and that is what happened with nato expansion. tonight we want to examine whether nato and the expanded nato alliance is reaping the worldwind of the decision in ukraine. we have a panel here of people who were present at the creation in one way or another. the former minister and then -- or first prime minister and then former minister of poland here and i will butcher your name. he was the prim minister in '87 when they were first invited to join. next is the foreign minister at the waning base of the soviet union and 1991-1996 of russia and was involved in this drama.
, to the white house. germany is one of our strongest allies, and angela is one of my closest partners. with her indulgence, i want to start by making two brief comments. first, as president, my top priority is doing everything that we can to create more jobs and opportunity for hard-working families, for our economic strength is a source of strength in the world. this morning we learned that our business has created 273,000 new jobs last month. all told our businesses have now created 9.2 million new jobs over 50 consecutive months of job growth. the grit and determination of the american people are moving us forward, but we have to keep a relentless focus on job creation and creating more opportunities for working families. there's plenty more that congress should be doing, from raising the minimum wage to creating good construction jobs, rebuilding america. and i want to work with them wherever i can, but i keep acting on my own wherever i must to make sure every american who works hard has the chance to get ahead. second point, i also want to say on behalf of the american people that our tho
on the border this morning, germany's chancellor angela merck la -- delivers as new message this morning. >> and the jobs number shows the economy may finally be bouncing back after a brutal winter. it's the most jobs added in two years. thein employment rate plunged to 6.3%, the lowest it's been since 2008. february and march job totals were revised up by a combined 36,000. the average now for the last three months, 238,000 jobs, about 60,000 more than the average for the three months before. big winners by sectors include business services, retail, food services, construction and health care. bottom line, this number was much bigger than anticipated but it's not all good news. part of the reason that the unemployment rate is down is of course that the total labor force dropped again, this time by more than 800,000 in april after increasing by half a million. that total jobs number added a big deal. if you think about it over the last five years, april, may, june, every time it looked like the economy was bouncing back, they would just sort of suck the life out of the economic recovery
for it to be viable. currently, there is no such airport in japan. in germany, lufthansa is betting heavily on two of the world's largest commercial aircraft. the latest model of the boeing 747, and the massive airbus a380. one of the company's executives explains why. >> we have to see the position of frankfurt and also our hub in munich, and maybe in zurich, vienna also in the lufthansa group system so we have a possibility to connect a lot of european cities from these huge hubs, which means if you compare this with tokyo, tokyo is not a hub like frankfurt when it comes to servicing so many neighborhood countries. >> reporter: the situation in japan means airlines there are counting on smaller and more maneuverable planes. >> translator: japanese airlines are doing well financially. for example, japan airlines has just posted a profit of $1.5 billion. as far as our earnings are concerned, japanese companies have adopted a sounder strategy than their overseas competitors. it does seem wiser to be shifting towards midsize aircraft. >> reporter: for the time being, jumbo jets and airbus a380s oper
exports gas into the eu the first country of transit let's say germany or ukraine or other eu countries, could not say, they couldn't dictate you may not pass this on without my permission to another country. what it allowed it to do the minute the gas comes into the eu it is not eu gas and to be transferred for the. as we talked before about reversing the clothes from poland hungary to slovakia into ukraine that would not impossible in 2009 because of the regular structure that was in place. by working with europe to get the regulatory structure their making some investments, getting them to make investments in infrastructure their less reliant today. but as russia will continue to be a supplier into europe there's more we can do together to make sure that reliance is diminished, and quite significantly. >> is a pipe dream for americans to see themselves in anything like the near future providing natural gas to europe and with that have any effect on our domestic market? or do we have so much that it would simply mean a new market and a new perhaps reduction in the trade imbalance if w
relationships between the u.s. and germany in the past. >> the snowden spy stuff really poisoned relationships. it is going to be on the back burner, but it will be raised. that won't dominate the conversation. there will be a little bit of talk about getting these trade talks back in order. merkel is meeting with companies in the states as well. for the most part, i think they have four hours of talk scheduled. this is going to be about ukraine's and how you unify and make sure that the u.s. and the eu are on the same page and how you can convince the russians the errors of their ways. >> hans, we will leave it there. correspondent,al hans nichols. >> pharma frenzy friday. uprazeneca's vid is going -- bid is going up. does seem, we were talking about consolidation. this is about drawing battle about right? this is every large pharmaceutical company trying to take a chunk of the business. >> what you have here is the king of the megamerger. they have done these deals before. destruction isue a big moot point. at the moment, what they're saying is they will a 50 quit on the table and are prepar
has put up for sale and includes other allergy medication such as claritin. reports say germany's buyer is closing in on a deal to buy the unit for about $14 billion. on wednesday, another possible bidder, said it was no longer in the running. they could announce the transaction in the next few days. shares in frankfurt at this hour, they're trading up, a bit over 1% at the moment. back to you. >> bertha, thanks for that. good to see you. >> you, too. >> thank you. >>> in earnings news, linkedin reported a net loss. excluding items, the professional social networking site beat analyst forecasts as revenue rose 46%. membership rose 7%, the same growth rate as the fourth quarter. linkedin is forecasting full-year revenue growth below analyst estimates. shares in linkedin today currently up, 4% in frankfurt. they were down heavily after hours in the united states. >>> kraft foods has reported higher first quarter profits helped by cost cuts and moves to manage prices for key ingredients. revenue fell which missed analysts forecasts. kraft will be raising prices for nearly half of i
in this northeast asia he said japan is not to following germany's tracking dealing with its wartime wrongdoings connick and what this report speaking to a german in the wednesday before a trip to frankfurt. japanese prime minister is she's alive and that his country would not follow germany's postwar track. and the question posed by frame creature out of my inspirations about whether tokyo she spends her journey when dealing with its historical wrong. abbott said the two situations are completely different. since world war two germany has provided full compensation to neighboring countries and published text of that reveal the heart of the german leader is perpetrated it's also apologize for his past wrongdoing. the prime minister up and said that neighboring european union had one common goal in mind that being an integrated europe. he said that is not the case for asia. on added that japan and its neighbors have really come to an agreement on compensation insurance. the prime minister then turned his attention to the current tensions and or the age of cleaning them on japan's neighbors. he sa
that is why the famous caravan route was called the king's road in east germany. i am. then i found. the silk route served as a rock to import chinese silk to the west country's ports of the turkic i got injected to ensure its safety of the trade caravans which passed through situation according to stuart diver reached or take our guns bought most of the goods coming from china. that is why the route connecting china would get the soup and some context and blossom between sixth and seventh centuries. extend aid to cities such as snow down to get our junk and said i should do this. according to the professor of history among them most of any of the silk road has dropped the connected with cars extend with european routes linking south context in which countries the middle east. after all. on top. i still don't. asic says three thousand kilometers in length thus the total length and also routes the past to present and we have amounted to five thousand kilometers i'm sure that archaeological excavations in research will reveal many more interesting facts about the famous among all the sock many
about. >> we have more from germany, asia, and now a growing number from china. >> we'll looking at a closer look coming up. >>> plus paying for college football recruits. it's not the schools that are handing out the cash, but there is a problem on campus. we'll explain when real money continues. >> on techknow... >> these are some of the amazing spider goats >> small creatures, big impact >> how strong is it? >> almost as strong as steel >> inspiring discoveries changing lives >> this could go in a human body... >> right >> this is for an achilles tendon >> techknow every saturday go where science meets humanity >> this is some of the best driving i've ever done, even though i can't see techknow >> we're here in the vortex >> only on al jazeera america ra >> creating jobs is a huge ra priority for city and states trying to boost their economies offering tax incentives is how they lure companies . north carolina and the city of charlotte, attracting hundreds of foreign firms by offering them a home with plenty of skilled workers, transportation options and low cost of living
. referring to the experience of germany. strictly't follow very . we are in a recovery stage and italy has got a public debt a bit higher than what germany had. i still think that the structural reforms they need do not require big deficits. they require implementation. i still prefer to see more work on structural reforms rather than saying -- >> it might be easier. that was the point i was making. >> it you look at the structural reforms, it boils down to the problem italy has had before. politics, it is mustering the support to push these reforms and have the dozens of political parties backing matteo renzi. is he the guy that is going to push this through? if he doesn't, does italy have a chance? >> it is more likely that renzi then berlusconi's government. willingness to implement structural reforms. renzi does have a fragmented majority behind him. however, it is also in the interest of the party. so renzi has to master the actually giving up implementing reforms. >> institutional reform or structural reform? one presumably has to go hand-in-hand with the other. get the institutional
will be gone, it meant when russian exports gas into the e.u., the first country of transit, germany, ukraine or other e.u. countries, they cooperate dictate you may not pass this on without my permission to another country. what it allowed it to do, the minute the gas comes into the e.u., it is now e.u. gas and can be transferred further. when we talked earlier about reversing the flows into ukraine, that would not have been possible in 2009 because of the regulatory structure that was in place. so by working with them to get the regulatory structure there, they are less relipet today. but as russia will continue to be a supplier into europe, there is more we can do together to make sure that reliance is diminished, and quite significantly. >> forgive the pun, but? is it a pipe dream for americans to see themselves in anything like the near future providing natural gas to europe, and would that have any effect on our domestic market? or do we have so much that it would simply mean a new market and a new perhaps reduction in the trade imbalance if we were able to do that. >> i think the unite
exports gas into the eu, the first country of transit, let's say germany or ukraine or other eu countries could not -- they could not dictate you may not pass this on without my permission to another country. what it allowed it to do is a minute a gas comes and it is eu gas and can be transferred further. we talked about reversing the flows from poland to hungary from slovakia into ukraine. that would not have been possible in 2000 nine because of the regulatory structure that was in place. i working with europe to get the regulatory structure there, making some investments and getting them to make investments in infrastructure, they are less reliant today. as russia will continue to be a supplier into europe emma there is more we can do together to make sure that that reliance is diminished and quite significantly. fors it a pipe dream americans who see themselves in anything like the near future europeng natural gas to and would that have any effect on our domestic market or do we have so much that it would ,imply mean a new market trades reduction in the investments if we were able to
recycling plant as well in germany. where does this leave the aluminum sector now? the prices are almost half in 2008. we have massive overproduction. >> we believe that -- actually we use the word cautiously optimistic now. what we see for the better part of 2014 and also into '14 is that we see aluminum demand outpacing aluminum production for quite some time now, which is a new situation we haven't seen for quite some time. with that being said, i think it is important to note that we do have a huge inventory and the industry is such that we'll have to come to the market at some point in time. just the fact that production is now lower than demand is a good situation for the industry. >> i suppose this is about demand outside china. how much does china impact, when you talk about demand outside china, talk about demand inside china. >> we believe china will be self-sufficient on primary production. we have said that for quite some time. we believe the industry very much concurs with that. we saw china back within we had the financial crisis quickly adapting to lower demand in their co
in germany. he suffered a stroke and has been receiving treatment there. the kurdish leader hasn't been seen in public for two years. >>> united states national weather service says around 75 million people in the country are at risk sfr storms that could unleash tornados. at least 27 people have died already. arkansas is the hardest hit state where rescue workers are working around the clock to search for survivors. andy gallagher reports from the devastated community of may d flower. >> reporter: the tornado has cut a path of restricti restriction -- destruction across three states but arkansas borre the bunt of the damage. homes and lives were left in ruins. >> our memories are gone. and we'll have to find them, hopefully. >> here's some memories, we have children and grandchildren. just trying to find some things that we have had all of our lives. >> reporter: the satellite images from nasa show the sheer size of the storm system and many are still in its path. >> i want everyone affected by this tragedy to know that fema and the federal government is on the ground and will help our fell
there. third, the largest supply of natural gas going into germany, and other eurtugal countries, they can't handle the tough sanctions if russia puts a stop to their natural gas. forthhough poland and so is tracking -- fracking a lot more. russia is the main gas supplier. we have to learn how to trade with them. of the gasesng rid from syria. they are trying to help. buy people with uneven vinegar. congress is thinking the old , back in theods 50's and 60's. it is a different time now. we are doing trade with china. but we are not doing anything with russia. they are the second strongest power in the world, and they could nuke us right off the planet. steve, what are you proposing, then? more diplomatic outreach with russia? more trade? caller: give the more say so in the g-8. wantger trade ties that we in the far east. things they want in europe and so forth. it is basic math and principles. let me bounce a few things off of you from what you said. here's daniel sanford. he covers russia, moscow for the bbc. he put this out. map of the day from the shell brochure. look at the m
at the rally came to watch television and the president casting his vote in germany. the kurdish leader not in public for two years and treated in berlin after a stroke in 2012. 22 million iraqis are eligible to vote on wednesday. one of the main campaign issues in iraq is poverty and nearly 10 million iraqis live on or below poverty line and living on less than $5 a day and many of the poorest have no faith that a vote will change anything. >> reporter: baghdad throws away these people used to bill and call it tin city, a sprawling slum in the northeast where at least 25,000 people live. from all over builders and other tradesmen drop trash here and they used this to dumb to build homes. as the children play he worries about the future and he not only looks after his own daughters but provides a home for five orphans whose parents died in the violence that plagues the city. >> translator: this is an oil-rich country but i've been living like this for 15 years. i don't have anything. the politicians come and make empty promises. we are fed up. we can't handle living like this anymore.
's stronger than what france can do. it means that europe must have a strong growth everywhere, in germany, spain, uk, to go to converge to this target. >> do you think the french economy would be able to benefit from the growth from other countries? >> that's one of the targets of the plan is to say we tried to improve the company's situation and in that case, it will be both to capture the eurozone trajectory. that's the target of the government. >> phillip, when we tried to reform the french economy, there's always something funny or perhaps even worrying. the best reform in france is always the one that is not impacting myself. so french people are reluctant of the impact of the reform. >> it's mostly everywhere always the same thing. it's always better when your neighbor is changing its mind in this situation. what we see and what is important currently in france is that gdp per capita growth, it means that what you earn is what i lost. there's one winner, one loser. and that's why it's practically difficult at this moment of the cycle. that's why manuel vass ask ed, o try to make thi
it was inconceivable that the u.s. would ever have troops even in eastern germany, let alone on soviet soil is a complete loss of contact. >> let's not forget that president reagan built up the military. he made america into a tremendously strong world power. barack obama, in contrast, is cutting down america's military. he's sending completely the opposite signal. >> president reagan was bitterly attacked by people like you when he signed the deal with the same power that president barack obama is using. >> let me interject because i want to get your thoughts on one other thing. according to "the daily beast," secretary of state john kerry said that if israel does not make peace soon, it could become, quote, an apartheid state. a two-state solution is really the only alternative because of unitary state ends up being a state that destroys the capacity of israel to be a jewish state. peter, what do you think of what secretary kerry said? >> what he said was almost verbatim as to what the two prime ministers have said. israel in the west bank is a place where millions of palestinians lack ci
and germany which is completely in bed with russia and given that dysfunction and disagreement, we can provide more leadership there. >> and seems to suggest something that's an unrealistic outcome, that they'll leap first. you've argued that china has benefited from the periods of frosty relations between the u.s. and russia since it does forge a tighter bond between china and its neighbor. do you think that's what's happening here? >> that's definitely one of possibilities. russia, if it becomes more isolated from europe as the crisis unfolds and nationally it's going to be clopushed clos to china. a gas deal almost a decade now and there's a possibility it might be signed because they have an opportunity. the chinese are awkward about the situation and don't like the idea of countries, one country invading and encouraging separatists but by sitting back they are -- in the long run. >> president obama denied charges that this is about containing china. we're not interesting in containing china. doesn't he have to expect that's how the trip will be read given the strong position he's taking i
back to the history books and what things were like in germany before world war i. of germany being a rising power but with historical grievances that they would soon be in a position to correct in some way. that does not mean conflict is inevitable. the tensions over the various maritime disputes and the other you really felt the potential for increasing amounts of conflict. >> you have been following this for a long time, your thoughts? >> the trip i took in march was my night trip to china between the u.s. china working group. it was a great quote i like to point out from a debate that took place between two people of letters well known in the d c area. they were arguing about china, one had been living there for a couple years and returned and the other had not. the guy who had not said the guy who had been there was too close to china. and he could not be objective about his views and the guy responded by saying surely there is a happy medium between having lived in china and having never been there at all. that put the guy in his place, he had never been there at all. i don't
siemens of germany. >> they stepped in. >> they want to create a deal that creates to european japanese instead of ge taking over. audience withe an the french president. is he going to wear dartmouth green tights? an audience? >> with a president whose approval rating is similar to that of our own president. i think it is bizarre. >> there is breaking news. will take on it more customers. this a top headline. they will divest almost 4 million customers. charter reap -- reports earnings later. >> no more headlines this morning. what else do we have? the yankees won. >> moving onto politics, war sanctions against russia over the crisis in ukraine. president obama says the u.s. and the eu will announce them later today. he spoke after arriving in manila as part of his asia trip. forwarde going to move with an expanded list of individuals and companies that will be affected by sanctions. they remain targeted. areas ofocus on some high tech defense exports to russia. we don't think they are appropriate to be exporting in this kind of climate. military has started exercises on the ukraine bo
. a big move in astra's shares, one of the top on the ftse, 14%. pfizer a slight bit higher in germany today. katherine boil is joining us with more on that. there's been a lot of discussion behind the scenes, is the next offer going to be a hostile one? >> well, it looks like pfizer is very much taking that tone with the statement today saying they made a couple of efforts to engage with astrazeneca management and they are not engaging back and are going directly to shareholders. what we have to see next is how much of a sweetener they are coming back for the shareholders because actually, if you look at astrazeneca shares today, they are trading close to the initial offer price made back in january. so pfizer definitely is going to have to add a little bit more to that to see shareholders really respond. >> no doubt the hedge funds are snipping around this deal already, but when we talk about the hostile approach, these are much more difficult to get across. but you have a backdrop where big farmer is on the move with the hallowed activity out there. do you think it's us is taped for
in kharkiv, germany is also condemning pro-russian militia. barnaby phillips has more from donetske in ukraine. >> the self appointed mayor, they are in no position to complain about what has happened to them. >> we are not prisoners of war. we are the guests of mayor ponomayork and treated as such. >> reporter: at least they were able to show their families they were alive and well. and later one observer from sweden was released on grounds of poor health. these men were also captured by pro-russian gunmen near slovyansk. this is how they looked after their interrogation. in the road into slovyansk, the ukrainian army. this is not a town under siege but the army is working on no more coming in. that's because the government in kyiv is very concerned at how russia will respond to any use of force by these men. in the next town, artemisk, a demonstration in favor of russia. it's a small crowd although they do seem to have some support on the sidelines. pro-russians, control the government building in donetske, they had an unexpected visitor one of russia's most wealthy men, now try
of germany from the dasm which was down 2%. and of course germany is most exposed immediately through the situation in ukraine. sanctions will perhaps hit russia. >> the energy more than anything else. >> as much as energy. germany exports an enormous of its good through russia. there's a close economic relationship. and if you start disrupting that then a major source for income for germany is being disrupted. so that's an issue. >> there's a close economic relationship. and if you start disrupting that then a major source for income for germany is but what really? s it really pay-back time as russia would like to put it because of what happened in the 90s and the collapse of the soviet union that we were allowed to go in and take over places of raugs russian strategic influence and was able to do that fairly in a cavalier way that now it's time that mr. putin says enough is enough? >> i worked in germany in that period of time. and was there in 1990 when german unification came about. and the soviet union collapsed. and nobody at that time would have imagined that nato would extend
the japanese? >> the cold war line if your attacked by germany and russia, who do you shoot first? the answer was, germany, business before pleasure. not a very nice cold war story. >> ooh! >> that's hard to -- obviously these attitudes go way back and are very deep and action sir bait -- exacerbated by world war ii and nobody has been prepared to tell the entire truth about, forth ruthly in the region so it does have an overhang i think matters quite a lot. it means that the koreans and others are
. if women worked the same as men in egypt, the country's gdp could grow by 34%. uae, 12%. germany and france, 4%. and even the united states could see 5% more growth. but let's be honest. women working has produced economic complications. a larger, competitive workforce has arguably kept wages from raising very much. the brookings institution says if you look at working age men, the real earnings of the median american male have decreased by 19% since 1970, for a variety of reasons. women working has also produced social complications regarding raising children. the hard harvard business review conducted a study of american women who had left work to have children. 93% of them wanted to return to work, but only 74% of them managed to do so and only 40% were able to return to full-time jobs. the transformation of women's lives has been one of the great changes in history. it will take time to get it right and put in place laws and practices that make it work. perhaps this will be one of the tasks that hillary clinton takes on if she gets that new job everyone is talking about in 2016. >>> up
today? here's how. straddling the border between the old czech republican of germany, when that border was between czech slo vauk ya and germany, it was divided by huge electrical fences. the deer were stood apart. a deer study was used to follow the movements of 100 red deer, 50 in germany and 50 in the czech republic. researchers found that the new generation of deer still respect the boundaries of the iron kurt tak -- curtain. according to the scientists who led the project, biologically it would make sense for the mountain range to be the natural barrier for the deer, not this invisible fence. but a mother passes on to her young a sense of where it is safe to go. the electric fence was a no go, ask these habits live on a generation later. perhaps the deer are teaching us all a lesson. it can take a longer time to break down barriers than put them up. >>> the correct answer is c. winston churchill is the only one to win the literature prize. if you guessed disraeli, he was indeed a novelist but he lived before the prize and couldn't have won it. thank you for joining us. i will see
of the day we need germany with the u.s. working together. because right now the europeans get 50% of their oil from russia. >> germany needs natural gas. >> they're not going to do it. >> at the end of the day, these sanctions to be most powerful have to be collective. the g7 came out with an announcement last night -- i think two nights ago. which looks like there would be an upcoming collective sanction. we need that to be real and to stick. i would challenge whether we see that. >> putin holds a lot of the cards here. >> exactly. >> he controls energy supplies and also supplies of metals. boeing has huge composure in the form of titanium. it doesn't look like the western world will push him very hard. can i talk about another failure? >> real quick. >> the president was in asia, he was in south korea. this doesn't have to deal with economics or business. it sure would have been nice to see him talking about human rights in north korea. the atrocities that are going on in north korea, the president had a chance to talk about that. >> what a point. >> i didn't see anything. >> w
the hearts of men. >> solar number is grown up. it's still got a long way to go. >> germany ranks number one for using the most solar energy, and the u.s. number four. >>> a waiter needs good coordinationing speed and buenos aires puts its waiters to the test. daniel schweimler reports on the art of waiting tables. >> reporter: efficiency, poise and grace are three of the virtuous required. they were all on display at the 10th annual race for waiters and waite reses in the heart of buenos aires. >> dante is a previous winner, with more than 30 years in the job, he knows what is required. >> translation: a good waiter must be friendly, respond rapidly and treat the customers as well as possible, always with a smile they are the main characteristics of a good waiter. >> he's worked at the bar in the legal district serving lawyers and judges for two decades, a profession he loves, because he numbers dealing with the public. an often mallined profession. some practice it with a certain alt of style -- amount of style and pan ash. nowhere is the art of waiting a table better preserved than here i
on the planet. and a new exhibit of art, banned by nazi germany. >> to actually see the art that was deemed as un-german is fascinating. >> rose: we have those stories and more on what happened and what might happen. >> there's a saying around here: you stand behind what you say. around here, we don't make excuses, we make commitments. and when you can't live up to them, you own up and make it right. some people think the kind of accountability that thrives on so many streets in this country has gone missing in the places where it's needed most. but i know you'll still find it, when you know where to look. captioning sponsored by rose communications >> rose: and so you began how? >> it's a very subjective process. >> rose: is it luck at all or something else? >> we're going to do this. >> rose: what's the object lesson here? >> they need to be called out for it. >> rose: tell me the significance of the moment. >> rose: president obama left washington on a post poped trip to asia. and for the first time in decades, an american won the boston marathon. here are thesitis and sounds of the past
on that. i'm sure you feel the same way about germany and parts of europe as well. but maybe they could pay a little more. i don't think you undermine the arrangement we had. >> i was based in china as a journalist. china is an extremely disruptive rising power potentially. think of all the american companies who manufacture, who supply chains include a lot of manufacturing in china, but also here. these are all stitched into the global patchwork quilt of globalization. at which america is a master mind. very well globalization, whatever pat buchanan may think. the absence of war in america as the preeminent security, it's expensive in terms of what we spend on ships and planes. we don't want to see japan arming to the teeth under a conservative nationalist prime minister picking fights with the northeast. >> isn't it comforting to you that capitalism serves as a restraint? you understand his reasoning. can you appreciate that and can you echo that? >> look. i think the problem that we have here in the united states is we have a weak economy and weakened economy that we can look forward
and i remember seeing him when i was a soldier serving in germany. and i stood in ankle-deep mud taking pictures of him for the newspaper for the eighth army infantry division, and i was astounded and enthralled with his deliverance. he was so, so much a man of the people. >> yeah. there was something remarkable about seeing pope john paul ii in person. and you could make the argument he was live and in person by more people around the world than any human being in history. his travels across the globe, he was someone who a lot of people came to see and flocked to see. and there was always this sort of gravitas about him. one of the times i got to see him was actually at the bee at occasion of pope john xxiii. and what was remarkable, there is something about john paul ii, and that something, i think, is what's being recognized tomorrow in both of these men. they're not being made saints because of their accomplishments as pope or because of the things they wrote or said. they're being cannonized, because the church recognizes what is already the case. that these were holy men, and that
's one in germany. there's only two really that would be available. >> thank you so much for your time. appreciate that. >> all right. >>> a teenager was stabbed to death in the stairwell of her high school on prom day. the stunned student body and police. they all want to know why. all stations come over to mission a for a final go. this is for real this time. step seven point two one two. verify and lock. command is locked. five seconds. three, two, one. standing by for capture. the most innovative software on the planet... dragon is captured. is connecting today's leading companies to places beyond it. siemens. answers. >>> investigators in connecticut are trying to figure out the motive behind a deadly attack on a 16-year-old honors student. it happened yesterday at a school in milford. just about 20 miles away from newtown. police say a classmate slashed maren sanchez to death in a school stairwell. this is heartbreaking. what happened? >> she was a very popular girl. we're hearing a lot on social media from her friends and family. at about 7:00 a.m. this all unfolded in the stair
quickly. you see some of the european economies are very tied to guest problems. germany has a pipeline underneath the baltics to connect directly to russia. i think that is one of the reasons you will see germany they do getnt -- their money from -- 40% of their gas from russia. the u.s. and russian economy is not nearly as integrated. there is certainly a love for he that it can cause us and european allies a lot of .inancial distress host: are we developing the infrastructure -- guest: i believe there are five or six lng terminal points. only one of those in louisiana is currently under construction. we are a long ways out from making the u.s. export industry to where we can help our allies in europe. opened a have recently liquefied terminal. we are equal to get fish eager get ---- we are eager to a lot of them are buying gas from russians. all of these countries are coming to us and saying, look, we are interested in buying energy resources but the problem is we are at least 10 years out from being able to fulfill the requests. host: we are talking with hannah thoburn from the fore
european countries - primarily germany, who, in theory, are in charge of the delegation. there are four germans, a czech, a pol, a dane and a swede. as you heard earlier in my report, the self-proclaimed mayor of slovyansk, a town under the control of separatist gunmen say they were accompanied by a man called a spy. we know that the separatists in slovyansk in recent days have taken a number of hostages... (technical difficulties) . >> we seem to have lost barnaby phillips. we've had a few technical problems connecting to him. we have the gist, of the group of o.s.c.e. monitors, missing, abducted in slovyansk, in the eastern part of ukraine. more on that as soon as we get it. in the meantime other news. >>> the palestine leadership is meeting to discuss peace talks after israel said it was pulling out. the decision followed a unity deal between fatah and hamas. the palestine prime minister quit his job, and that makes way for the formation of a new unity government. under the agreement elections could be held as early as 2015. >>> now, the u.s. president barack obama says leaders on bo
the league vie -- after verdict >> versai will les, by allowing kreup reparations against germany, the country that succeeded in being the guarantor of the global system after the war, underwriting the world bank, the integration.obal if you look at its distressing fatigue with the world, most demonstrate bid a to support aternational organizations, disstressing difficulty in consensus political for trade agreements that integration, a failure indo what's self evidently the interest of american workers support the xm banks, see, to,there for you, a failure a concern and a desire to ramp back military spending in a our potential adversaries military spending is rapidly. a reluctance to become embroiled in foreign challenges because they are too hard. ultimately, whether we will judged by history to have won the piece after the cold war, as we did after the second world war is in more today than would have seemed likely five or 10 years ago. the conventional security challenges, the conventional economic integration challenges that i've talked about. it's also the challenge of and g
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